Tag Archives: Mayo Clinic Videos

GERD – Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Diagnosis

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive disorders in the world. It happens when acid comes up from the stomach, which is acid-resistant, into the esophagus, which is less acid-resistant. Dr. James East, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic Healthcare in London, says GERD may be common, but there can be potentially severe complications if it’s ongoing and left untreated.

Lung Cancer Diagnosis: Robotic Bronchoscopy

Robotic GPS system for early lung cancer detection.

Lung cancer typically is diagnosed at a later stagethan other malignancies, due to the lack of early warning indications. In 2020 it was China’s most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality. LungHealth MedTech, a medical robotics company in Shanghai, has developed a robotic-assisted bronchoscopy platform that can address some of the current diagnostic challenges and treatment limitations.

Cervical Cancer: Its Risks, Symptoms & Treatment

Learning about cervical cancer can be intimidating. Kristina Butler, M.D., a gynecologic oncologist at Mayo Clinic, walks you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction 0:38 What is cervical cancer? 1:16 Who gets cervical cancer? / Risk factors 2:23 Symptoms of cervical cancer 3:03 How is cervical cancer diagnosed? 4:26 Treatment options 5:20 Coping methods/ What now? 6:10 Ending

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Blood Pressure: What Is Hypertension? (Video)

Learning about hypertension can be intimidating. Leslie Thomas M.D., a nephrologist at Mayo Clinic, walks you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction 0:39 What is hypertension? 1:13 Who gets hypertension? / Risk factors 2:18 Symptoms of hypertension 2:36 How is hypertension diagnosed? 3:14 Treatment options 3:51 Coping methods/ What now? 4:05 Ending

COMMENTARY:

Hypertension is an elevation of the blood pressure in the arteries. It is measured conventionally by blood pressure cuffs, although a catheter in the artery is more accurate. I’ve had my blood pressure taken countless numbers of times by nurses and doctors who sometimes put the cuff on my arm through a piece of clothing, making it less accurate. Sometimes it is taken by an automatic blood pressure cuff even in the doctors office. The automated cuff can be purchased for $20 or less for you to use it at home, but it’s accuracy is questionable when you have an irregular heartbeat with atrial fibrillation such as I do.

The blood pressure reading which is considered to be normal Is dropping. In the present video, following 2017 guidelines , they state that a systolic reading of more than 120 mmHg is elevated, and anything more than 130 is hypertension. It may be true that studies have been done to show that these slight elevations cause problems, but so can the drugs that are used to lower blood pressure; a cough can be caused by ACE inhibitors. Fatigue and fainting can be caused by an excessive dosage of any blood pressure medication.

Healthy diet, especially avoiding extra salt, Regular exercise and good sleep will go a long way towards keeping your blood pressure at 120 or below on the high reading (systolic), and 80 on the low reading (diastolic).

My systolic blood pressure varies between 120 and 140 systolic, and is usually around 60 diastolic. For a long time I thought the relatively low (diastolic) blood pressure was more important, since diastole is of greater duration than systole, but it has now been determined that the systolic blood pressure reading is the one to worry about. Calcification and lack of elasticities in the arteries as you get older can lead to higher systolic blood pressure.

It used to be thought that the normal systolic blood pressure was 100+ your age in years. Those days are gone, however, and greater life expectancy and health Is one result of carefully monitoring your blood pressure, and working hard to keep it down.

Please refer to the Mayo Clinic article to give you (much) more information.

—Dr. C.

Strokes: Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Treatment

Subarachnoid hemorrhages account for approximately 1.2 million cases of stroke each year, and nearly 40% of those cases are fatal. Dr. Rabih Tawk, a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon explains the early signs of a subarachnoid hemorrhage and how it’s treated.

Bleeding in the space between the brain and the tissue covering the brain.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage, a medical emergency, is usually from a bulging blood vessel that bursts in the brain (aneurysm). It may lead to permanent brain damage or death if not treated promptly.

The main symptom is a sudden, severe headache.

Hospital care is needed for supportive care and to stop bleeding and limit brain damage. Treatment may include surgery or catheter-based therapy.

Artificial Intelligence: Its Benefits For Radiology

Using artificial intelligence in health care seems like a futuristic concept, but it’s something that’s being used now to complement the knowledge of doctors. Radiology was one of the first areas that saw a lot of AI applications.

Dr. Bradley Erickson, director of Mayo Clinic’s AI Lab, says in the case of radiology, machine learning is used to complete some of the more time-consuming work. Beyond that, the diagnostic capabilities of AI are what attracts a lot of the appeal. While imaging-related AI has seen a lot of advancements, Dr. Bhavik Patel, director of AI at Mayo Clinic Arizona, says the next step is looking at AI applications for preventive health and shifting the mindset from pipeline to platform thinking.

There are a broad area of applications (for AI), starting in radiology, but really spreading into the rest of the clinic, including cardiology and even pathology.

Melanoma: Men Have Higher Mortality Rates

Researchers say men are more likely to die from melanoma than women. And by the time a man is 50, the likelihood of developing melanoma increases every year, compared with women.

“The main risk factors for melanoma are sun exposure, amount of sun exposure, high-level sun exposure — meaning sunburns — but also light skin color,” says Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., a Mayo Clinic dermatologist.

The most common places for melanoma to occur are body parts exposed to the sun, including the face, back, arms and legs. The first signs are often a change to an existing mole or an unusual-looking growth on the skin.

“The big problem with melanoma is not only that it starts in the skin, but that it can spread. And it can be deadly,” says Dr. Sekulic.

Avoid prolonged exposure to the sun, especially in the middle of the day to prevent sunburns. Wear protective gear outside, such as a broad-brimmed hat, tightly woven clothing that covers your arms and legs, and sunglasses to protect your eyes. And use sunscreen generously with a sun protection factor of 30 or higher on exposed areas of skin. Reapply at least every two hours. And if you’re swimming or sweating, use water- and sweat-resistant sunscreen.

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Insulin Resistance: Risk Factors And Treatment

Learning about insulin resistance, or prediabetes, can be intimidating. Eleanna De Filippis, M.D., Ph.D., an endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic, walks you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction 0:41 What is insulin resistance? 1:32 Who gets insulin resistance? / Risk factors 2:38 Symptoms of insulin resistance 4:04 How is insulin resistance diagnosed? 4:34 Treatment options 5:21 Coping methods/ What now? 5:41 Ending

COMMENTARY:

The (developed) world just has too much food. Food producers race with each other to make It tastier, to advertise it widely, and make it available on demand. As a consequence of their success, at least 1/2 of the developed world is overweight and has decreased insulin sensitivity, prediabetes or diabetes. This leads to severe health consequences in the form of hypertension, arteriosclerosis, heart disease, brain disease, liver disease, and a variety of back and joint problems.

Mankind did not evolve in an environment of chronic nutritional oversupply, but rather it’s reverse. Mankind did not develop in a sedentary environment, but rather it’s reverse.

Insulin resistance is caused by overfilled energy stores (excess fat), increased inflammation from distended, dying fat cells, excess fatty acids and stresses to some of the important micro structures in our cells, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, not to mention metabolic pathways such as the mTOR and Sirtuin systems.

Eating is a pleasure, and turning down food takes self-discipline, which is a pain, and is becoming increasingly unpopular. “Maybe a pill will come along to get rid of fat and prevent its accumulation”. but don’t count on it. The main hope for avoiding the danger of overnutrition is being discriminating about what and how much you eat.

Exercise is inconvenient and uncomfortable, but is the second necessity for a healthy life. Two of its many benefits is to increase adiponectin, which increases burning of the fatty acids which are so toxic to the body, and to increase insulin sensitivity, counteracting type two diabetes.

The third necessity is getting enough sleep.

Replay the old record. Diet, exercise and sleep, sleep  diet and exercise.

Please excuse me, it’s time for my evening exercise.

—Dr. C.

For more reading visit: https://mayocl.in/3waShVV.

Mayo Clinic: Bladder Cancer Explained

Learning about bladder cancer can be intimidating. Mark Tyson, M.D., a urologist at Mayo Clinic, walks you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction 0:37 What is bladder cancer? 0:53 Who gets bladder cancer? / Risk factors 1:32 Symptoms of bladder cancer 1:59 How is bladder cancer diagnosed? 2:39 Treatment options 3:25 Coping methods/ What now? 4:04 Ending

For more reading visit: https://mayocl.in/3vcSF5u.

Diagnosis: Age-Related Hearing Tied To Dementia

Age-related hearing loss may be linked to an increased risk of cognitive decline. And according to two large studies, … Dr. Ronald Petersen, a Mayo Clinic neurologist, says the exact reason why is not known. It also could be that hearing loss leads to social isolation, which can lead to an increased risk in dementia.

Dr. Petersen recommends getting your hearing assessed every two to three years, especially if you’re noticing signs that your hearing may be deteriorating. The fix could be as simple as needing to get earwax removed.