Tag Archives: Mayo Clinic Videos

Physical Exams: Hip And Lumbar Spine (Mayo Clinic)

Dr. Karen Newcomer – Hip and Lumbar Exam Guide

This video demonstration contains the components necessary to perform a physical examination on a patient with a complaint related to their lumbar spine and hip region. At the beginning of the video, I will demonstrate the basic examination components of inspection, palpation and range of motion I will then show you special tests including Trendelenburg test (compensaved and uncompensated), Stork test (provocation of posterior elements of spine and lumbar nerve roots), straight leg raise (lumbar radiculopathy), Faber test (intraarticular hip and sacroiliac joint provocation) and Fadir test (femoroacetabular impingement).

Opioids: Postsurgical Pain Management (Mayo Clinic)

Read more

Medicine: Kidney Disease Explained (Mayo Clinic)

Chronic kidney disease, also called chronic kidney failure, involves a gradual loss of kidney function. Your kidneys filter wastes and excess fluids from your blood, which are then removed in your urine. Advanced chronic kidney disease can cause dangerous levels of fluid, electrolytes and wastes to build up in your body.

Video timeline:  0:31 What is kidney disease?  1:09 Who gets kidney disease/risk factors?   2:24 Kidney disease symptoms 3:03 How is kidney disease diagnosed? 3:53 Treatment options   5:23 Coping methods/ What now?  6:16 Ending    

Read more

Video: Heart Arrhythmia Red Flags (Mayo Clinic)

Mayo Clinic Minute: Watch for these heart arrhythmia red flags.

A heart arrhythmia (uh-RITH-me-uh) is an irregular heartbeat. Heart rhythm problems (heart arrhythmias) occur when the electrical signals that coordinate the heart’s beats don’t work properly. The faulty signaling causes the heart to beat too fast (tachycardia), too slow (bradycardia) or irregularly.

Heart arrhythmias may feel like a fluttering or racing heart and may be harmless. However, some heart arrhythmias may cause bothersome — sometimes even life-threatening — signs and symptoms.

Cancer: The Mayo Clinic Explains Lymphoma (Video)

Learning about lymphoma can be intimidating. Let our experts walk you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.

Video timeline: 0:24 What is Lymphoma?  1:20 Types of Lymphoma 2:04 Who gets Lymphoma? 2:48 Risk factors 3:30 Symptoms 4:10 How is Lymphoma diagnosed?  5:07 Treatment options   6:11 Coping methods/ What now?  7:09 Ending   

 For more reading visit: https://mayocl.in/3xThjs7

Procedures: Preparing For A Colonoscopy (Mayo)

A colonoscopy is an exam used to detect changes or abnormalities in the large intestine, or colon, and rectum. It’s an important exam that’s performed to check for colon cancer. But some would agree that preparing for the colonoscopy is worse than the exam itself.

In this Mayo Clinic Minute, Dr. James East, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic Healthcare in London, explains what patients will need to do to prepare for this exam and how to make it a little easier.

Technology: Wearable Heart Monitors (Mayo)

It’s like an auto mechanic running a diagnostic test on your car’s engine while it’s out of the garage and traveling down the road. Wearable heart monitors are valuable tools that cardiologists use to determine if you are experiencing atrial fibrillation, which is your heart beating at an irregular or rapid rhythm.

Health: Distinguishing Between Flu & Covid-19

MAYO CLINIC STUDY: MASKS PREVENT SPREAD OF COVID

Mayo Clinic researchers recently published a study that shows the proper use of masks reduces the spread of respiratory droplets. The findings strongly support the protective value and effectiveness of widespread mask use and maintaining physical distance in reducing the spread of COVID-19. Reporter Jason Howland has more in this Mayo Clinic Minute.

Mayo Clinic: ACL Tears – When Surgery Is Needed

ACL tears can sideline an athlete or crush an Olympic dream. It’s a common knee injury affecting nearly twice as many women than men. Dr. Cedric Ortiguera, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist, says 150,000‒200,000 ACL injuries occur each year in the U.S., and that number is growing as more children become involved in competitive sports year-round. The good news is that surgery can help get some athletes get back in the game.