Tag Archives: Cardiology

Telecardiology: Wearable Devices Monitoring Heart Patients Using AI (Harvard)

In the future, remote monitoring of health data using wireless–enabled devices that measure a person’s weight, blood pressure, blood sugar, pulse, and heart rhythm could further advance telehealth’s promise.

“I imagine a world where we are continuously monitoring key health factors and using artificial intelligence to monitor those signals,” says Dr. Schwamm. 

From a patient’s perspective, virtual visits save a lot of time. You don’t need to take time off work or other commitments to drive, park, and sit in a waiting room before your visit. And even though you’re not in the same room, you may actually get more direct eye contact with your physician, thanks to the face-to-face nature of video calling.

Another advantage: you may be able to have another person — such as a family member who lives across town or across the country — join the video call. That could be especially helpful if you’re facing an upcoming procedure or discussing a serious health concern. Just as with in-person visits, it’s nice to have another person listening, asking questions, and taking notes.

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MEDICAL PODCAST: “ASSESSING CHEST PAIN” (BMJ)

Chest pain is a common chief complaint. It may be caused by either benign or life-threatening aetiologies and is usually divided into cardiac and non-cardiac causes. James E. Brown, Professor and Chair, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Kettering, Ohio, gives us an overview of assessing chest pain in the emergency setting. 

COMMENTARY

Dr. James E Brown of the Wright State school Of medicine in Kettering Ohio gave a very interesting discussion of chest pain.

One interesting takeaway is the value of a very experienced clinician dealing with large volumes of emergency room patients. This would make telemedicine with an emergency room hub in a teaching center a very attractive platform.

The consultant doctor in the center has the advantage of his vast experience in rapidly narrowing down the heterogeneous list of different diagnoses that must be considered- the “differential diagnosis”.

Dr. Brown mentioned the “gestalt”, the incorporation of subjective features such as facial and voice cues which add to the objective parameters in patient evaluation. This of course would be amenable to telemedicine although other old-time clinical information like the changes in breath sounds would be more favorable to conventional in-person evaluation.

Ultrasound would More easily be done locally as well.

An interesting take away from this discussion is the value of The patient’s history and past laboratory data, so undervalued by rushed modern doctors. For instance, Electronic medical records (EMR) could provide past history or a previous electrocardiogram for comparison.

Dr. Brown favors the division of chest pain causes into cardiac and non-cardiac. It is easy  to develop tunnel vision and look at the patient only as a possible coronary thrombosis. In fact it is better to Rapidly consider the non-cardiac causes that would demand immediate attention while waiting for the results of the Troponin-T test.

For instance pulmonary embolism, aortic dissection, tension pneumothorax, cardiac Tamponade should be considered.

These considerations should be running through the head of the clinician as the IV,  EKG, and pulse oximetry are being set up.

In addition to the Troponin-T, bedside ultrasound, and Higher “slice count” CAT machines, and higher “Tesla” MRIs  are becoming available major centers which could support small emergency rooms.

If there is One place where “the Flow” would be Appropriate it would be in the mind of the emergency room doctor evaluating acute chest pain.
I have a hard time imagining artificial intelligence endangering her job.

—Dr. C.

TELEHEALTH: “Smartphones Used to Monitor Heart Patients with Pacemakers”

In a first of its kind study, Cleveland Clinic researchers found Bluetooth-enabled pacemakers successfully transferred information to doctors 95% of the time through an app on the patient’s smartphone or tablet. In comparison, traditional bedside consoles were successful 77% of the time.

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CARDIOLOGY PODCAST: “ATRIAL FIBRILLATION – A COMPREHENSIVE OVERVIEW”

Atrial fibrillation is chaotic and irregular atrial arrhythmia, the prevalence of which increases progressively with age. It causes significant morbidity and death. Many patients are asymptomatic or have symptoms that are less specific for cardiac arrhythmias, such as mild dementia or silent strokes. 

Gregory Lip, Price-Evans Chair of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Liverpool, gives us an overview of the condition.

Read more on Atrial Fibrillation at BMJ