Tag Archives: Cleveland Clinic

Reviews: Heart Attacks Vs. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) isn’t the same as a heart attack, though people often use the terms interchangeably. While both are life-threatening heart conditions, understanding the differences could be lifesaving.

When it comes to cardiac arrest versus a heart attack, it can be easy to get them confused. You may be wondering, Is cardiac arrest the same as a heart attack?

Both a heart attack and cardiac arrest can be scary and life-threatening medical conditions affecting your heart, but there are differences in how and why they occur.

A heart attack is caused by a blockage. It happens when an artery blocks the blood flow to your heart.

Cardiac arrest is an electrical issue. It occurs when quick, irregular impulses take over your heart’s rhythm.

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Nutrition: The Benefits Of Vitamin B9 & Folic Acid

Vitamin B9 is one of eight B (B-complex) vitamins that help your body change food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose) to produce energy. You need B9 for the health of your liver, skin, hair and eyes, and to keep your nervous system working properly.

Cleveland Clinic – Vitamin B9 helps your body make healthy new cells, supporting many of its functions, and may help prevent health issues from developing. It’s proven critical for reproductive health, too.

“It’s essential for people who are pregnant to take folic acid supplements to support healthy fetal growth and development,” notes Zumpano. “When you’re trying to conceive or are pregnant, it’s extremely difficult to get the amount of vitamin B9 needed.”

Studies show that people who take folic acid supplements before conception and during the first trimester of pregnancy may reduce their risk of having children with neural tube defects (birth defects of the brain and spine such as spina bifida) by 40% to 80%. Early evidence suggests folic acid may also be associated with a lower risk of autism, severe language delays and emotional issues.

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Tetanus: What It Is & When Should You Get A Shot

Cleveland Clinic – A tetanus shot is a vaccine. It protects you from tetanus, a life-threatening bacterial infection. Babies and kids need several doses of the vaccine at different ages. Adults should get a tetanus booster shot every 10 years. You get the shot in your upper arm or thigh. The shot is safe, and serious complications are very rare.

Chapters: 0:00 Intro 0:15 What is tetanus? 1:04 When should you get a tetanus shot? 1:41 When should you get a tetanus booster? 2:02 What is tetanus immune globulin? 2:26 Conclusion

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Blood Glucose Levels: What Is Insulin Resistance?

Cleveland Clinic – If you have insulin resistance, your body doesn’t respond to insulin like it should. Insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas, regulates your blood glucose levels.

And if your blood glucose (or blood sugar) levels become too high, it can lead to hyperglycemia or even prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes.

Chapters: 0:00 What is insulin? 0:28 What is insulin resistance? 0:55 What are risk factors of insulin resistance? 2:06 Symptoms of hyperglycemia 2:30 Can insulin resistance be treated?

Resources: Insulin Resistance: What It Is, Causes, Symptoms & Treatment – https://cle.clinic/3ETWG47

Dr. C’s Journal: Some Facts Regarding Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is an ancient killer, and is one of the few diseases that has been traced back to Ancient Egypt and beyond. TB has ravaged humanity for millennia, and was commonly called consumption due to its tendency to produce weight loss.

Once thought to be under control, TB has received a new lease on life with the emergence of AIDS. All countries except North America, western Europe, and Australia have a problem with tuberculosis, which kills more than 1 million people each year.

The tuberculosis germ is unusual in that It has a cell wall high in the lipid, mycolic acid. This protects the germ when it is engulfed by first responders such as macrophages. The infected cell Is surrounded by other macrophages, lymphocytes and Fibroblasts to form a granuloma. This creates a standoff, where the tuberculosis germ is still alive, but walled off, and becomes an inactive or “latent” case of tuberculosis, a small percentage of which become active each year.

Active tuberculosis produces the usual infectious symptoms of fever, chills, and cough, often productive with blood. The tuberculosis germ multipliesu much more slowly than most other bacteria and the symptoms are long and drawn out; a cough lasting for more than a month, especially if accompanied by weight loss, should raise the suspicion of TB.

TB can spread to infect bones, kidneys, liver, and brain,  but prefers the lung.

A spot on the Lung, confirmed by a Tuberculin test, or a blood test called a T-spot, will confirm the diagnosis.

The slow multipication of the tuberculosis Germ requires much longer treatment, and the combination with AIDS has caused a  rapid development of resistant organisms. Fortunately, there are several drugs available.

Only one immunization is currently available, namely BCG. This has been used a lot in Europe and other countries . BCG produces a weekly positive tuberculin test.

A large number of conditions which reduce immunity, such as cigarette smoking, drug use, and immunosuppressive treatments associated with organ transplants and cancer will  predispose a person to catching tuberculosis. TV is transmitted in the tiny droplets from sneezing, coughing, or talking such as we were accustomed to thinking about during Covid. The same preventative measures, such as  masks and avoiding close contact with infected individuals should be practiced to prevent spread from an infected person.

If you follow a healthy lifestyle and are careful when traveling, you will most likely have no trouble with this nasty infection. Please check with the following reference or more complete information.

—Dr. C.

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C. diff Bacteria: What Is Clostridioides difficile

“C. diff is a severe, difficult-to-treat infection,” says family medicine specialist Daniel Allan, MD.
Studies show that you’re seven to 10 times more likely to get C. diff while you’re taking antibiotics or right after.”

Cleveland Clinic – Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) is a type of harmful bacteria that causes inflammation in your large intestine (also known as pseudomembranous colitis). The main symptom of a C. diff infection is frequent, watery and sometimes bloody diarrhea. If diarrhea persists, it can lead to:

  • Dehydration.
  • Weight loss.
  • Sepsis.
  • Death.

C. diff is common in the environment. Some people even carry C. diff in their gut but don’t have any signs of illness. Most of the time, the “good” bacteria in your gut prevent a C. diff infection. But certain antibiotics can wipe out your gut bacteria. If you encounter C. diff while taking antibiotics, the bacteria can flourish and grow and make you sick.

“Think about your colon as a plush green lawn. The thick grass crowds out the weeds,” illustrates Dr. Allan. “But if your yard is mostly dirt, all kinds of weeds will grow. Antibiotics reduce the rich collection of bacteria in your gut (the thick grass). This gives C. diff (the weeds) an opportunity to take hold.”

C. diff is most dangerous for people age 65 or older or with a weakened immune system. People who are healthy can also develop life-threatening complications if they don’t receive prompt care.

Digestive: Gallstones VS Kidney Stones Symptoms

Gallstones (gallbladder stones) develop in your digestive tract and can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball. Gallstones can cause a blockage in your gallbladder or bile ducts. A diet high in fat or cholesterol can contribute to the development of gallstones.

CLEVELAND CLINIC

Kidney stones develop in your urinary tract and can be as small as a grain of sand but can grow to several inches in diameter. Kidney stones move through your urinary tract into your ureter and block the flow of urine. A diet high in sodium, oxalates or animal protein can contribute to the development of kidney stones. An insufficient intake of fluids or calcium can also lead to the formation of kidney stones.

Symptoms of gallstones

If you have gallstones, you may experience the following symptoms:

  • Abdominal pain.
  • Back pain.
  • Chest pain.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Fever and chills.
  • Jaundice.
  • Dark-colored urine.  

Where does it hurt?

Gallstones cause pain in your mid-upper abdomen that may radiate to your back or under your right shoulder.

Symptoms of kidney stones

If you have kidney stones, you may experience the following symptoms:

  • Severe back pain that may travel down to your groin.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Blood in your urine.
  • Painful urination.
  • Increased frequency or urgency of urination.
  • Foul-smelling or cloudy urine.
  • Fever and chills.

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Eye Health: The Causes Of Nearsightedness (Myopia)

Cleveland Clinic – Nearly 1 out of 3 people have a vision disorder called myopia, or nearsightedness, which makes it difficult to view things in the distance. How does it happen? And is there a cure?

Chapters: 0:00 Intro 0:32 What causes nearsightedness? 1:01 Why can’t you see far? 1:20 When does nearsightedness usually begin? 1:42 What are symptoms of nearsightedness? 1:59 Can nearsightedness be corrected? 2:23 Is there a cure for nearsightedness?

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Supplements: Melatonin For Sleep Is Non-Addictive

Melatonin is a hormone that is naturally made by your brain in response to darkness,” says sleep specialist Marri Horvat, MD. “When someone takes melatonin, they are either trying to increase the amount of this hormone overall or increase the amount they have in their body at a certain time to help them fall asleep.”

While there are some possible setbacks to taking melatonin (depending on how your body reacts), it isn’t addictive. Turns out, even if you depend on melatonin to make you fall asleep, it won’t cause your body to become dependent on it.

“As we age, we have a natural decrease in the amount of melatonin we produce, so supplementation can often be helpful,” Dr. Horvat explains.

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Eye Health: The Signs And Diagnosis Of Cataracts

Cataracts in the eye lens are a later-in-life reality that leads to vision problems for many people. This video shares describes what cataracts are, how they form, and warning signs to help you detect them early.

Chapters: 0:00 Intro 0:10 What are cataracts? 0:43 What are the warning signs of cataracts? 2:44 How are cataracts diagnosed? 3:04 Talk to your eye doctor