Basal Cell Carcinoma: Diagnosis And Treatment

The skin is The largest organ in the body. It certainly receives the largest amount of ionizing radiation from the sun, the most common cause of genetic mutation of cells of the skin. As you get older, these mutations build up, leading to an increasing number of skin cancers that need removal.

In my younger years, I had red hair and lots of freckles. Between the freckles I had a little pigmentation to protect me from the sun. The only sunscreen then available was a messy white paste called zinc oxide, and I resorted to it infrequently. I was out a lot playing tennis, hiking and camping, and even skied once or twice. I did wear hats a lot, especially as I got older and wiser, but still it is amazing I’m not having more trouble now.

I go to the dermatologist every 3 to 6 months to get my actinic keratoses frozen off. These are the little patchy,rough irregularities in the skin that can grow into basal cell, and sometimes squamous cell cancer. I have had just one skin cancer, a basal cell, which I discovered when there was a patch on my chin that kept bleeding when I shaved. One of my classmates in medical school was a plastic surgeon, and kindly removed this lesion with a minimum of scarring.

Lots of doctors, usually Dermatologists, currently specialize in Mohs surgery, in which the basal cell  cancer is gradually shaved off until its margins, the edge of the shaved biopsy, show no cancer.

The moral of the story is to avoid unnecessary ultraviolet exposure. Don’t go to tanning studios. If you must be in the sun, put on sunscreen, and wear a hat. Some would argue that if you stay out of the sun you will get vitamin D deficiency. It is true that vitamin D Is important, and I would recommend checking your blood vitamin D level every year or so. But would rather take my vitamin D in a capsule than get it from sun exposure.

—Dr. C.

Skin Cancer: The 3 Main Types (Cleveland Clinic)

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The good news is, this disease is extremely treatable if caught early. Cleveland Clinic experts break down the 3 main types of skin cancer and how you can spot the signs of each.

Chapters: 0:00 Intro 0:24 What does skin cancer look like? 0:49 What are the signs of skin cancer? 0:59 What are the types of skin cancer? 1:06 What is basal cell carcinoma? 1:35 What is squamous cell carcinoma? 1:52 What is melanoma? 2:26 When should you talk to your doctor about skin cancer?

Knee Osteoarthritis: New Study Shows Telehealth Visit Benefits (Harvard)

Physical Exams: Hip And Lumbar Spine (Mayo Clinic)

Dr. Karen Newcomer – Hip and Lumbar Exam Guide

This video demonstration contains the components necessary to perform a physical examination on a patient with a complaint related to their lumbar spine and hip region. At the beginning of the video, I will demonstrate the basic examination components of inspection, palpation and range of motion I will then show you special tests including Trendelenburg test (compensaved and uncompensated), Stork test (provocation of posterior elements of spine and lumbar nerve roots), straight leg raise (lumbar radiculopathy), Faber test (intraarticular hip and sacroiliac joint provocation) and Fadir test (femoroacetabular impingement).

Telehealth: How Doctors Can Expand Care (AMA)

Continuing the AMA’s “Look Forward/Look Back” series, AMA CXO Todd Unger talks with Meg Barron, the AMA’s vice president of digital health strategy, about the role of telehealth post-pandemic and a new program that can help practices optimize and expand their telehealth efforts.

Nervous System: Multiple Sclerosis Explained (Mayo)

Learning about multiple sclerosis can be intimidating. Let our experts walk you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.  

 Video timeline: 0:24 What is multiple sclerosis?   1:15 Types of multiple sclerosis 1:29 Who gets multiple sclerosis/risk factors?    3:11 Multiple sclerosis symptoms 3:40 How is multiple sclerosis diagnosed? 4:39 Treatment options    5:29 Coping methods/ What now?   6:23 Ending     

 For more reading visit: https://mayocl.in/3t24QSG  

Empowering Patients Through Education And Telemedicine