Tag Archives: Health

Reports: Tufts Health & Nutrition, November 2022

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Inside the Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter – November 2022:

  • Give Thanks for Good Health
  • Newsbites: Vitamin D; red meat and CVD risk; psyllium and constipation
  • Grain Products: Don’t be Fooled by Healthy-Sounding Labels!
  • Special Report: Top 3 Reasons to Avoid “Top Foods” Lists
  • Diet and Hemorrhoids
  • Featured Recipe: Fresh Cranberry Orange Relish
  • Ask Tufts Experts: Processed foods; calcium intake

Diet: Consuming Olive Oil Daily Lowers Heart Risks

Consuming just a half-tablespoon or more of olive oil a day is linked to a lower risk of dying from heart disease and other chronic health conditions, new research suggests.

photo of a hand holding a bottle of olive oil and drizzling it on a dish of quinoa

The study included more than 92,000 women and men from the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, who filled out diet questionnaires every four years for 28 years. Olive oil intake was calculated from how much they reported using in salad dressings, on bread and other food, and in baking or frying.

Compared with participants who rarely or never consumed olive oil, those who consumed the most (about a half-tablespoon or more daily) had a 19% lower risk of dying from heart disease during the study. Researchers also noted lower death rates over all among people who substituted olive oil for a similar amount of margarine, butter, mayonnaise, or dairy fat. The findings, published Jan.18, 2022, in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, lend further support for choosing olive oil — a key component of the heart-friendly Mediterranean diet.

Read more at Harvard Health

NEWSLETTERS: TUFTS HEALTH & NUTRITION – SEPT 2022

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Is That Popular Diet Plan a Healthy Choice?

Some attention and planning may be necessary to ensure popular diet plans provide enough of all the nutrients you need.

SPECIAL REPORT: Small Amounts of Physical Activity Can Have Big Benefits

Grab-n-Go Lunch

FEATURED RECIPE: Hummus and Veggie Wraps

ASK TUFTS EXPERTS: Activated charcoal; oatmeal vs. oat bran

NEWSLETTERS: TUFTS HEALTH & NUTRITION – AUGUST 2022

Easy, Flavorful, Exciting Veggies

Knowing how to build flavor in vegetable dishes can help you enjoy more of these healthful foods.

The research is clear: eating more whole or minimally processed plants is better for our health. Knowing how to easily make foods like vegetables taste great can help you consume more of these health-promoting options in place of less healthful choices. Building Flavor. Most U.S. adults don’t meet the recommended intake of vegetables. When

NEWSLETTERS: TUFTS HEALTH & NUTRITION – JULY 2022

  • NEWSBITES: Physical activity in older adults; low- and no-calorie drinks
  • Hydrating for Health
  • SPECIAL REPORT: Cholesterol, Explained
  • Red, White, and …Berries!
  • FEATURED RECIPE: Chickpea Salad with Strawberries
  • ASK TUFTS EXPERTS: Why we say “people with obesity;” Cholesterol and genes

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Health: How To Recover From An Ankle Sprain

NUTRIGENOMICS: HOW DIET CAN REPROGRAM OUR DNA

The burgeoning field of “nutrigenomics” claims that the food we eat can alter our genetics. Dietitians, scientists and lifestyle companies have all hopped on the bandwagon.

Nutrigenomics (also known as nutritional genomics) is broadly defined as the relationship between nutrients, diet, and gene expression. The launch of the Human Genome Project in the 1990s and the subsequent mapping of human DNA sequencing ushered in the ‘era of big science’, jump-starting the field of nutrigenomics that we know today.

Inflammation: Three Ways It Affects Your Health

Acute inflammation happens as a part of our defense mechanism to clear out pathogens. So when a virus or bacteria invades us, we need to quickly mount an acute inflammatory response to get rid of the pathogen. Sometimes, that acute immune response isn’t enough to get rid of the pathogen. That’s when we elevate the level to the adaptive immune response. That’s when you involve specific lymphocytes, T and B cells, to fight off the infection.

So inflammation is a necessary process for dealing with pathogens but sometimes, it can also turn against us. Chronic inflammation happens because the body fails to get rid of the cause of the inflammation, such as viruses and bacteria. In those conditions, such as, you know, chronic infection with HIV or hepatitis virus or lung COVID, in which case we there may be a persistent viral reservoir that’s causing this chronic inflammation, the inflammation itself becomes the enemy.

Even though inflammation evolve to counter pathogens, it’s also engaged by other causes, and so having this amount of fat, for example, alone is able to trigger the immune system and induce the chronic inflammatory response that then fuels further problems to happen because the body is sort of trying to fight off a non-existent infection and therefore, it can sort of engage a chronic state of inflammation.

I can’t think of a disease which doesn’t involve inflammation, but we are now learning more and more about the physiological role of inflammation. Homeostasis ensures that we have a normal operation of different physiological functions like heart rate, breathing and glucose levels or insulin levels. Those two system, the inflammatory system and the homeostasis, they work together to maintain each other. Sometimes, the inflammatory response has to override the homeostatic response.

That includes things like adaptation to a different diet. The immune cells are now known to be able to sense differences in dietary conditions and adapt the intestine for future absorption of nutrients. This kind of events that are not necessarily at all related to pathogens, but for maintaining physiology. Inflammatory responses are integral in order to maintain health. So a molecular-level understanding of inflammation is necessary to understand the logic by which these systems function, and also it provides the pharmaceutical target for future therapies of inflammatory diseases.

Diet News: Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter (Mar ’22)

This month, read about:
Spring Greens!NEWSBITES: Vitamin B12 and
depression; vegetables for bone healthChrononutritionYour Amazing Digestive SystemDiet and Your ThyroidAsk Tufts Experts: Nutrition Label Nutrients … Diet and Diverticulitis

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