Category Archives: Technology

Hospital Tech: The Johns Hopkins Stroke Center

The mantra of The Johns Hopkins Hospital’s Comprehensive Stroke Center is “time is brain.” Innovations and teamwork help ensure that this mantra applies to all stages of stroke recovery. Take a peek into the multifaceted treatment strategies offered by the center’s team of experts.

These include stroke risk screenings, hyperacute emergency treatments, innovative hospital care such as digital therapeutics, early rehabilitation, programs to ensure smooth transitions to home, and cutting-edge clinical research. The Stroke Center team is on a mission to improve the life of every patient who has had a stroke. #Stroke #JohnsHopkins

Emergency Care: Flying Intervention Team Use In Acute Ischemic Stroke

In a nonrandomized controlled intervention study published in JAMA, researchers in Germany assessed whether deployment of a flying interventional team, consisting of a neurointerventional radiologist and an angiography assistant, was associated with a shorter time to endovascular thrombectomy for patients in rural or intermediate population areas in Southeast Bavaria.

This video explains the study design. Click https://ja.ma/FIT for full details.

COMMENTARY:

Stroke prevention by a healthy lifestyle, including a good diet, regular exercise, and sleep is of course preferable to treatment.

However, stroke still claims more than 100,000 lives per year in the United States, and is a major factor in disability.

Recognition of a stroke is the first crucial step, and has been discussed in DWWR previously; FAST is the Menmonic and guiding principle. Ask the patient to smile, and it may be assymmetric, with one side drooping. Ask the patient to raise both arms, and one may drift down. Ask the patient to repeat a simple sentence, and he may be unable to do so. And above all be speedy, since time is of the essence, and treatment must take place within a very few hours.

Modern medical centers in large cities frequently have a team dedicated to treating stroke. The patient goes for a CT or MRI while  the Catheter team assembles. An intravenous clot dissolver, tPA, is often used, or possibly a catheter is inserted into an artery and guided to the  proper location. Sometimes the clot is mechanically removed as in the accompanying video.

The helicopter stroke response team featured in the posting is one aspect of the speed that is so essential; any delay will result in death, sometimes permanently, of brain cells.

Acute Heart attack treatment is basically similar to stroke, and was the pioneering venture into the interventional radiology described above. Also, the heart may be the source of the clots that lodge in the brain, especially from atrial fibrillation.

Please enjoy the following video which shows how mechanical clot removal is achieved.

—Dr. C.

Esophageal Cancer: Early Treatment Is Critical

While a serious form of cancer, five-year survival rates have quadrupled over the last several decades. What’s key to these positive outcomes? Dr. Shanda Blackmon says early detection allows for minimally invasive treatments that can preserve the esophagus. Having a minimally invasive esophagectomy typically allows a patient to recover quicker with less pain than an open esophagectomy.

Technology: How AI Is Helping To Cure Blindness

Precancerous Polyps: AI Reduces Screening Misses

Artificial intelligence reduced by twofold the rate at which precancerous polyps were missed in colorectal cancer screening, reported a team of international researchers led by Mayo Clinic. The study is published in Gastroenterology.

Skin Cancer Removal: The Benefits Of Mohs Surgery

Mohs surgery is a highly effective skin cancer removal procedure that takes just a few hours. It is most often used to treat basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, the two most common skin cancers.

Chapters: 0:00 How effective is Mohs Surgery? 0:23 When is Mohs Surgery used? 0:50 How does Mohs Surgery work? 1:55 Does Mohs Surgery cure skin cancer? 2:06 How long is the recovery period after Mohs Surgery?

Mayo Clinic: Treatments For Brain Aneurysms

Robert D. Brown Jr., M.D., M.P.H., E. Paul Lindell, M.D.,Giuseppe Lanzino, M.D., and Harry Cloft, M.D., Ph.D., explain what a brain aneurysm is and the different treatment options there are at Mayo Clinic for a patient with a brain aneurysm.

Mayo Clinic neurovascular experts care for 17,000 people each year with aneurysms, strokes, and other blood vessel and cerebrovascular conditions. Each brain aneurysm is unique. Your doctor will use state-of-the-art arterial imaging to evaluate, diagnose and assess the aneurysm’s risk of rupture.

Every patient has team of doctors working together to create an individualized path of care. Some aneurysms do not require surgery and are closely monitored instead.

Find out about the care you can receive for brain aneurysms at Mayo Clinic at https://mayocl.in/370ZldS

Technology: AI Offers Window On Heart Health

AI can pick up on subtle clues from a person’s physiological state such as their heart rate, the time differences between each heartbeat or the electrical signals their heart produces in order to identify irregularities that point to medical conditions.

“Being able to detect atrial fibrillation just by wearing a wristwatch all the time, that kind of relatively simple technology could actually have a massive impact,” explained consultant cardiologist Tim Fairbairn, cardiovascular imaging lead at Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital in the UK.