Tag Archives: Dr. C Opinions

THE TWO SIDES OF STRESS

Stress in modern times most often has a BAD connotation. Stress is blamed for a raft of disorders from headaches to cardiovascular disease. Indeed, stress activates the adrenocortical “alarm reaction”, and if unremitting can indeed implement many chronic problems.

ACUTE stress, however, is often beneficial. The body responds favorably to measured amounts of brief stress, especially if it is YOUR CHOICE, and not demanded of you. It is WORK, when you would rather be doing something else. It is FUN when you are hiking up a steep but beautiful trail in the Swiss Alps. The flavor of reality takes place in the mind.

HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS (HSP) illustrates how your body works. If you get a little overheated, HSPs are produced and benefit any misfolded proteins that result. If you go hungry, a metabolic pathway burns fat and increases insulin sensitivity. If you exercise your mind, BDNF and new neurons result.

THE BODY ADJUSTS TO THE DEMANDS, and benefits flow. The body is designed to function. The trouble is that placing demands on the body is effortful, and effort requires discipline. The Paleolithic Hunter-gatherer lifestyle, the reality to which our metabolism is attuned, REQUIRED plenty of aerobic exercise, just to get food and avoid harm.

Our modern life is replete with deadlines and requirements, and hearts beat rapidly from ANXIETY rather than aerobic demand. Even the trades, which used to require physical energy expenditure have a lot of labor-saving devices. Children, insead of running, ride around on electrically propelled scooters. Little wonder that people are “out of shape” and gaining weight.

–Dr. C

THE DOCTORS 101 CHRONIC SYMPTOMS & CONDITIONS #18: SKIN INFECTIONS

The skin is the protective barrier between the inside of our bodies and the outside world of microorganisms, parasites and toxins. It is often the site of inflammation and infections.

In past times, before the advent of cleanliness and antibiotics, mankind was plagued by erysipelas, boils, carbuncles, and other severe infections of the skin, which are rarely seen now. The beta hemolytic streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus were ubiquitous in the past, and mostly are contained today.

Severe Infections presently require some skin abnormality, immune deficiency, neglect, animal bite or other breach of skin integrity to be a problem. Antibiotic resistance, however, is allowing some organisms like MERSA to make a comeback.

ECZEMA. or Atopic Dermatitis, was common in my medical practice. This condition weakens the skin barrier, allowing Staphylococcal infection to gain a foothold. In my day, If there were a flare of eczema severity, antibiotics would often help. Leg edema and swelling. such as from heart failure, especially coupled with diabetes and blood vessel disease is also an invitation to infection, such as cellulitis.

Redness, swelling, warmth and pain- the classic rubor, tumor, calor and dolor- as well as swollen local lymph nodes and fever often betray infection of the skin. Please see the recently posted infographic on celulitis.

IMMUNE DEFICIENCY raises the likelihood and risk of severe skin infections. Infection from “flesh-eating bacteria”, often beta hemolytic streptococci in deep tissue planes , is a medical emergency. Immediate surgery is often needed.

Disproportionate PAIN after injury or surgery is often a clue. Certain age groups have characteristic skin infections, such as the scalded skin syndrome of infants, and the acne of adolescents. Viruses, molds, and arthropods can also infect the skin.

Viruses, such as herpes in particular can simulate bacterial infection. Ringworm from fungi is easy to distinguish, but arthropod bites, and especially bee sting can look very much like bacterial infection. Scabies and mite infestation are so itchy as to be distinct.

Topical antibiotics applied on skin breaks like cuts or breaks are useful in preventing infection. These ointments and creams are like “artificial skin”. Once again, prevention is key.

–Dr. C.

THE DOCTORS 101 CHRONIC SYMPTOMS & CONDITIONS #13: “BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA” (BPH)

I have known about the Prostate gland, which surrounds the urethral channel exiting the bladder, since med school. I have seen evidence of its enlargement in the increasing time it takes older men to empty their bladders.

When my dad had his prostate surgery, he said that he could blast the porcelain right off the toilet, I could then appreciate for the first time that enlargement of the prostate caused a weak urinary stream.

When I started waking up at night 3 or 4 times to urinate, it really hit home. I had to get something done. My Urologist was a very good one, like all of my doctors. As the old saying goes, the best is none too good when it comes to your health.

On my first visit, he ordered a “Urodynamic” study. In this test, done by a visiting nurse who had the equipment, a small catheter, or tube, ws passed into my bladder, after loading myself with water until I could hold it no longer. The pressure in my bladder was measured, the speed with which I evacuated my bladder was measured, the volume of urine I passed was measured, as well as the volume retained in the bladder.

With these numbers, my bladder volume, residual, and the resistance to flow was calculated. I was shown to have a small bladder, too much residual retained after I emptied it, and an excessive resistance to the flow of urine out of the bladder.

I have not seen the urodynamic studies mentioned in the modern workup of BPH, and it may not have been critically necessary. I did appreciate his thoroughness, however, and factored in the study when he gave me the options of medicine vs. surgery.

were two medicines mentioned, an alpha adrenergic agonist, and finasteride, an anti-androgen. Since I would have to take both meds the rest of my life, I chose surgical enlargement of the urinary passage through the prostate, known technically as a “roto rooter job”. I, too, noticed the power of my urinary stream after the surgery.

A good friend of mine, also a physician, took medicines for many years, in spite of increasing trouble urinating, getting up at night, and frequent bathroom trips during the day. He eventually went to see a urologist after he had to go to the ER for completely being unable to pass urine.

The Urologist declined to do surgery on the basis of his health, the unusually large size of the blockage, and degree of obstruction. He used a catheter to relieve himself several times a day for the rest of his life. Had I been in his shoes, I would have tried to find a willing surgeon somewhere, perhaps at a university med school.

But then again, I wouldn’t have waited so long. These days many more options are available, and the appended article discusses some of them. –

–Dr. C.