Tag Archives: Strokes

Hospital Tech: The Johns Hopkins Stroke Center

The mantra of The Johns Hopkins Hospital’s Comprehensive Stroke Center is “time is brain.” Innovations and teamwork help ensure that this mantra applies to all stages of stroke recovery. Take a peek into the multifaceted treatment strategies offered by the center’s team of experts.

These include stroke risk screenings, hyperacute emergency treatments, innovative hospital care such as digital therapeutics, early rehabilitation, programs to ensure smooth transitions to home, and cutting-edge clinical research. The Stroke Center team is on a mission to improve the life of every patient who has had a stroke. #Stroke #JohnsHopkins

Emergency Care: Flying Intervention Team Use In Acute Ischemic Stroke

In a nonrandomized controlled intervention study published in JAMA, researchers in Germany assessed whether deployment of a flying interventional team, consisting of a neurointerventional radiologist and an angiography assistant, was associated with a shorter time to endovascular thrombectomy for patients in rural or intermediate population areas in Southeast Bavaria.

This video explains the study design. Click https://ja.ma/FIT for full details.

COMMENTARY:

Stroke prevention by a healthy lifestyle, including a good diet, regular exercise, and sleep is of course preferable to treatment.

However, stroke still claims more than 100,000 lives per year in the United States, and is a major factor in disability.

Recognition of a stroke is the first crucial step, and has been discussed in DWWR previously; FAST is the Menmonic and guiding principle. Ask the patient to smile, and it may be assymmetric, with one side drooping. Ask the patient to raise both arms, and one may drift down. Ask the patient to repeat a simple sentence, and he may be unable to do so. And above all be speedy, since time is of the essence, and treatment must take place within a very few hours.

Modern medical centers in large cities frequently have a team dedicated to treating stroke. The patient goes for a CT or MRI while  the Catheter team assembles. An intravenous clot dissolver, tPA, is often used, or possibly a catheter is inserted into an artery and guided to the  proper location. Sometimes the clot is mechanically removed as in the accompanying video.

The helicopter stroke response team featured in the posting is one aspect of the speed that is so essential; any delay will result in death, sometimes permanently, of brain cells.

Acute Heart attack treatment is basically similar to stroke, and was the pioneering venture into the interventional radiology described above. Also, the heart may be the source of the clots that lodge in the brain, especially from atrial fibrillation.

Please enjoy the following video which shows how mechanical clot removal is achieved.

—Dr. C.

Neurovascular Disease: Stroke Awareness & Care

Mayo Clinic’s Eugene L. Scharf, M.D., Robert D. Brown Jr., M.D., M.P.H. and Harry Cloft, M.D., Ph.D. discuss how the team at Mayo Clinic provides each patient individualized care to help maximize quality of life. 700,000 to 800,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. Many people can lower their risk of stroke with medical risk factor modification. When a stroke occurs, prompt treatment is crucial. Every minute counts and can reduce brain damage and other complications. “Some patients who would have had a devastating stroke come out of the hospital with no deficient, no difficulties whatsoever,” says Robert D. Brown Jr., M.D., M.P.H.

Studies: Salt Substitutes Lower Stroke, Death Risks

Heart Health: What Is Cholesterol? (AHA Video)

There are two types of cholesterol: LDL cholesterol, which is bad, and HDL, which is good. Learn why too much cholesterol and elevated triglycerides can lead to heart disease and stroke. Make it a priority to have your cholesterol checked.

Brain Health: How To Recognize Strokes (Video)

If you don’t know the signs of a stroke, you’re not alone. Thirty percent of people under the age of 45 don’t either. The key is to B.E. F.A.S.T. Learn how this acronym can help you save a life. The information in this video is accurate as of 9.17.21 and is for information purposes only. Consult your local medical authority or your healthcare practitioner for advice. Resources: Stroke: Causes and Prevention: https://cle.clinic/3hIHtab Stroke Signs & Symptoms: https://cle.clinic/3oLyQhc Stroke Risk Factors: https://cle.clinic/3hJ8r1s

HEALTH: HOW ‘STATINS’ PREVENT HEART ATTACKS AND STROKES’ (CDC VIDEO)

Statins are a type of medication used to lower the level of bad cholesterol in the blood and reduce build-up in arteries that can cause a heart attack or stroke. This short animated video explains the importance of statins, how they work, and why your doctor may prescribe them.

MEDICINE: ‘THREE CRITICAL BREAKTHROUGHS IN STROKE RESEARCH’ (YALE VIDEO)

Stroke is far more common than you might realize, affecting more than 795,000 people in the U.S. every year. It is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Yet until now, treatment options have been limited, despite the prevalence and severity of stroke.

Not so long ago, doctors didn’t have much more to offer stroke victims than empathy, says Kevin Sheth, MD, Division Chief of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology. “There wasn’t much you could do.” But that is changing. Recent breakthroughs offer new hope to patients and families. Beating the Clock Think of stroke as a plumbing problem in the brain. It occurs when there is a disruption of blood flow, either because of a vessel blockage (ischemic stroke) or rupture (hemorrhagic stroke).

In both cases, the interruption of blood flow starves brain cells of oxygen, causing them to become damaged and die. Delivering medical interventions early after a stroke can mean the difference between a full recovery and significant disability or death. Time matters. Unfortunately, stroke care often bottlenecks in the first stage: diagnosis. Sometimes, it’s a logistical issue; to identify the type, size, and location of a stroke requires MRI imaging, and the machinery itself can be difficult to access.

MRIs use powerful magnets to create detailed images of the body, which means they must be kept in bunker-type rooms, typically located in hospital basements. As a result, there is often a delay in getting MRI scans for stroke patients. Dr. Sheth collaborated with a group of doctors and engineers to develop a portable MRI machine. Though it captures the images doctors need to properly diagnose stroke, it uses a less powerful magnet. It is lightweight and can be easily wheeled to a patient’s bedside.

“It’s a paradigm shift – from taking a sick patient to the MRI to taking an MRI to a sick patient,” says Dr. Sheth. Stopping the Damage Once a stroke has been diagnosed, the work of mitigating the damage can begin. “Brain tissue is very vulnerable during the first hours after stroke,” says vascular neurologist Nils Petersen, MD. He and his team are using advanced neuro-monitoring technology to study how to manage a patient’s blood pressure in the very acute phase after a stroke.

Dr. Petersen’s research shows that optimal stroke treatment depends on personalization of blood pressure parameters. But calculating the ideal blood pressure for the minutes and hours after a patient has a stroke can be complicated. It depends on a variety of factors—it is not a one-size-fits-all scenario. Harnessing the Immune System Launching an inflammatory reaction is how the body responds to injury anywhere in the body – including the brain, following stroke. However, in this case, the resulting inflammation can sometimes cause even more damage.

But what if that immune response could be used to the patient’s advantage? “We’re trying to understand how we can harness the immune system’s knowledge about how to repair tissues after they’ve been injured,” says Lauren Sansing, MD, Academic Chief of the Division of Stroke and Vascular Neurology. Her team is working to understand the biological signals guiding the immune response to stroke.

That knowledge can then direct the development of targeted therapeutics for the treatment of stroke that minimize early injury and enhance recovery. “We want to be able to lead research efforts that change the lives of patients around the world,” says Dr. Sansing.

Learn about these developments and more in the video above.

For more information on aneurysms or #YaleMedicine, visit: https://www.yalemedicine.org/conditio…