Videos

Prevention: How Our Diet Boosts The Immune System

New Scientist – The biggest immune organ is our gut and what we eat can support a healthy immune response. From eating the rainbow, consuming more fermented foods or fasting longer overnight, King’s College epidemiologist Tim Spector has top tips to boost your immunity through what you eat.

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Ear Health: Diagnosing And Managing ‘Tinnitus’

Mayo Clinic – About 1 in 5 people experience the perception of noise or ringing in the ears. It’s called tinnitus. Dr. Gayla Poling says tinnitus can be perceived a myriad of ways. Hearing loss can be age-related, come from a one-time exposure, or exposure to loud sounds over a lifetime.

Dr. Poling says the tiny hairs in our inner ear may play a role. Dr. Poling says there’s no scientifically proven cure for tinnitus, but there are treatment and management options. Other options include using a sound generator or using a fan at night. If ringing in your ears bothers you, start by seeing your health care provider for a hearing test.

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EPIGENETICS & AGING: DNA BREAKAGE & REPAIR EFFECTS

Harvard Medical School – A 13-year international study in mice demonstrates that loss of epigenetic information, which influences how DNA is organized and regulated, can drive aging independently of changes to the genetic code itself.

It also shows that restoring the integrity of the epigenome reverses age-related symptoms.

Learn more at https://hms.harvard.edu/news/loss-epi…

Cardiology: When Chest Discomfort Is Serious

Mayo Clinic – Chest discomfort and pain account for more than 6.5 million emergency department visits in the U.S. each year. Discomfort can be the first sign of a serious heart event or a symptom of other medical conditions. Dr. Regis Fernandes, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, says people should seek medical care at the first sign of chest pain.

Reviews: The Lancet On Top Five Health Priorities

The Lancet (January 2023) – For our 200th anniversary year we have identified five Spotlight subjects of particular importance. Watch as Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief, and other Lancet Editors around the world outline these Spotlights and discuss priorities for the future of health.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases | Journal | ScienceDirect.com by Elsevier

This year, we draw attention to the most critical issues impacting health globally, the extraordinary people involved in tackling them, and the voices of those most impacted. For five Spotlights, we will run a programme of activities to bring these issues to life and convene the right people and resources in order to drive change in these areas.

Spotlight on Universal Health Coverage
Ensuring all populations globally have access to affordable, quality health care

Spotlight on Research for Health
Prioritising evidence to guide and inform decision making

Spotlight on Child and Adolescent Health
Prioritising the health needs of children and adolescents now

Spotlight on Health and Climate Change
Tackling climate change through the lens of human health

Spotlight on Mental Health
Implementing sustainable global mental health in a fragmenting world

MEDICAL REVIEW: ‘SINGLE-PORT ROBOTIC SURGERY’

Freethink – Robotics are helping make minimally invasive surgeries even less invasive. Case in point: single-port robotic surgery, a relatively new type of approach where a robotic system controlled by a human surgeon executes the procedure by making only one incision into the patient.

Although still relatively uncommon, single-port surgery has been gaining momentum in recent years. The benefits are noticeable. Compared to traditional surgery, single-port surgery might leave patients with shorter recovery times, less scarring, and overall better outcomes.

The technique is also transforming how surgeons think about and execute surgery itself. “It’s allowing us to do surgeries differently than we do with [multi-port surgery],” said Michael Stifelman, M.D., director of robotic surgery at Hackensack University Medical Center. “What every patient wants is to get back to their life. Single-port robotics is allowing us to get them to that point more quickly.”

Learn more about the future of single-port surgery in this episode of “Operation: Reimagine Surgery,” a Freethink original series produced in partnership with Intuitive, which created the world’s first commercially available robotic surgery system in the 1990s.

Reviews: Heart Attacks Vs. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) isn’t the same as a heart attack, though people often use the terms interchangeably. While both are life-threatening heart conditions, understanding the differences could be lifesaving.

When it comes to cardiac arrest versus a heart attack, it can be easy to get them confused. You may be wondering, Is cardiac arrest the same as a heart attack?

Both a heart attack and cardiac arrest can be scary and life-threatening medical conditions affecting your heart, but there are differences in how and why they occur.

A heart attack is caused by a blockage. It happens when an artery blocks the blood flow to your heart.

Cardiac arrest is an electrical issue. It occurs when quick, irregular impulses take over your heart’s rhythm.

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Reviews: WHY ARE FLU, RSV AND STREP SURGING IN 2022?

Daniela Hernandez | WSJ – Getting the flu can increase the risk of getting a second infection, including strep throat. WSJ’S Daniela Hernandez explains the science behind that, plus what it means for the rest of the winter and how we can protect ourselves so the tripledemic doesn’t get worse.

Video timeline: 0:24 – Flu Damage 1:25 – Lower population immunity 2:03 – Who’s most vulnerable? 3:05 – How can we protect ourselves?

Medicine: Living Donor Liver Transplantation

Cleveland Clinic – In living donor liver transplantation a portion of a donor’s healthy liver is transplanted into a recipient in need. Living donor liver transplantation is possible because the liver, unlike any other organ in the body, has the ability to regenerate (regrow). Most regeneration of both the donor’s and recipient’s livers occurs within the first 8 weeks.

All potential donors will undergo a complete medical and psychosocial evaluation. Not everyone is suitable or eligible to become a living liver donor based on a number of factors such as pre-existing medical conditions, psychosocial concerns, or liver size. Donating an organ is a personal decision that should only be made after becoming fully informed about its potential risks and benefits.

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