Videos

Women’s Health Review: Mammogram Guidelines

Mount Sinai Health System (May 31, 2023) – When and how often to have a screening mammogram is a choice you must make. Different expert groups do not fully agree on the best timing for this test.

Before having a mammogram, talk to your provider about the pros and cons of having the test. Ask about:

  • Your risk for breast cancer
  • Whether screening decreases your chance of dying from breast cancer
  • Whether there is any harm from breast cancer screening, such as side effects from testing or overtreatment of cancer when it’s discovered

Mammography is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. Mammography is generally recommended for:

  • Women starting at age 40, repeated every 1 to 2 years. (This is not recommended by all expert organizations.)
  • All women starting at age 50, repeated every 1 to 2 years.
  • Women with a mother or sister who had breast cancer at a younger age should consider yearly mammograms. They should begin earlier than the age at which their youngest family member was diagnosed.

Mammography is also used to:

  • Follow a woman who has had an abnormal mammogram.
  • Evaluate a woman who has symptoms of a breast disease. These symptoms may include a lump, nipple discharge, breast pain, dimpling of the skin on the breast, changes of the nipple, or other findings.

Reviews: Hydrocortisone Use In Severe Pneumonia

NEJM Group (May 25, 2023) – Glucocorticoids can help mitigate the adverse consequences of pneumonia, but whether they can reduce mortality in severe community-acquired pneumonia is unknown. New research findings are summarized in a short video.

CONCLUSIONS

Among patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia being treated in the ICU, those who received hydrocortisone had a lower risk of death by day 28 than those who received placebo.

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Reviews: Brain Tumor Risk Factors & Symptoms

Mayo Clinic (May 17, 2023) – Learning about a brain tumor can be intimidating. Alyx Porter, M.D., a neuro-oncologist at Mayo Clinic, walks you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction 0:37 What is a brain tumor? 1:38 Who gets a brain tumor? / Risk factors 2:26 Symptoms of a brain tumor 3:36 How is a brain tumor diagnosed? 4:13 Treatment options 6:24 Coping methods/ What now? 7:14 Ending

For more reading visit: https://mayocl.in/3ciMNB7.

Technology: New Head & Neck Cancer Treatments

Mayo Clinic (May 11, 2023) – In the U.S., HPV is linked to about 70% of throat and mouth cancers. And more than 70% of those cancers are diagnosed in men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Treatment for throat and mouth cancers, also referred to as oropharyngeal or head and neck cancers, will depend on location and stage of the cancer as well as other factors. Dr. Phillip Pirgousis, a Mayo Clinic head and neck surgeon, says patients have safer, less invasive surgical treatments available to them thanks to ongoing innovation.

Heart Health: How The Aorta Functions (Yale)

Yale Medicine (April 29, 2023) – The aorta is a complex organ responsible for carrying blood to all organs and tissues in the body. Many disease conditions with catastrophic complications are associated with aortic pathologies, including aneurysm disease, aortic dissection, aortic ulcer and hematoma.

Care of patients with aortic diseases remains highly complex and requires the combined expertise of a multidisciplinary team of cardiovascular surgeons, neurologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, vascular surgeons, and specialized advanced practice providers.

Research: The Digital Medicine Revolution

Scripps Research (April 11, 2023) – From smartwatches and fitness bands to glucose monitors and in-home ultrasounds, the proliferation of digital devices is igniting a revolution in healthcare and medical research.

Patients can now collect thousands of data points about themselves and share that information with their healthcare providers. At the Scripps Research Translational Institute, researchers are taking advantage of new technology to study disease in novel ways.

Their projects include a platform for early detection of disease outbreaks, a sleep quality study, and even a way to predict and individual’s risk of certain disease based on their genetics. In this video, hear directly from the team about this exciting new frontier.

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Bipolar Disorder: How It Is Diagnosed & Managed

Cleveland Clinic (April 6, 2023) – About 5.7 million adults in the U.S. have bipolar disorder. The lifelong mental health condition, which includes four different types, is known for the maniac and depressive episodes someone experiences.

Chapters: 0:00 Intro 0:26 What is bipolar disorder? 0:50 What does a manic episode feel like? 1:18 What does a depressive episode feel like? 2:00 How to manage bipolar disorder

What is bipolar disorder?

Bipolar disorder (formerly known as manic-depressive illness or manic depression) is a lifelong mood disorder and mental health condition that causes intense shifts in mood, energy levels, thinking patterns and behavior. These shifts can last for hours, days, weeks or months and interrupt your ability to carry out day-to-day tasks.

There are a few types of bipolar disorder, which involve experiencing significant fluctuations in mood referred to as hypomanic/manic and depressive episodes. However, people with bipolar disorder aren’t always in a hypomanic/manic or depressive state. They also experience periods of normal mood, known as euthymia.

READ MORE at Cleveland Clinic

Sleep & Aging : What Can Be Expected? (Yale Medicine)

Yale Medicine (March 12, 2023) – As we age, are melatonin starts rising at an earlier hour in the night, thus we may tend to go to sleep earlier than when we were younger. We still require the same number of hours of sleep (7-9 hours on average), so we may also rise earlier. Our sleep is more likely to be disturbed by medical conditions, medications, or substance use.

Kidney Failure Reviews: The History Of Dialysis

Cleveland Clinic (March 9, 2023) – Nephrologist Sevag Demirjian, MD takes you through the history of dialysis and explain discoveries and innovations along the way.

What is dialysis?

Dialysis is a treatment for people whose kidneys are failing. When you have kidney failure, your kidneys don’t filter blood the way they should. As a result, wastes and toxins build up in your bloodstream. Dialysis does the work of your kidneys, removing waste products and excess fluid from the blood.

Who needs dialysis?

People who have kidney failure, or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), may need dialysis. Injuries and conditions like high blood pressurediabetes and lupus can damage kidneys, leading to kidney disease.

Some people develop kidney problems for no known reason. Kidney failure can be a long-term condition, or it can come on suddenly (acute) after a severe illness or injury. This type of kidney failure may go away as you recover.

There are five stages of kidney disease. In stage 5 kidney disease, healthcare providers consider you to be in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or kidney failure. At this point, kidneys are carrying out around 10% to 15% of their normal function. You may need dialysis or a kidney transplant to stay alive. Some people undergo dialysis while waiting for a transplant.

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Chronic Kidney Disease: New Medication Review

Mayo Clinic (March 6, 2023) – About 15% of adults in the U.S. are estimated to have chronic kidney disease — that’s about 37 million people.

What if those people could be treated with medication that could slow the progression of their disease, and help avoid the need for dialysis and kidney transplantation altogether?

Dr. Naim Issa, a Mayo Clinic transplant nephrologist says there is a class of medications to help people with chronic kidney disease that does just that. He says Mayo Clinic has been incorporating these medications to help patients for the last few years.

March 9 is World Kidney Day, a day aimed at raising awareness about the importance of the kidneys.

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