Tag Archives: Symptoms

Infographic: How Bodies React To Burn Injuries

Infographic: Diagnosis Of Gastrointestinal Pain

Inflammation: How To Treat Ulcerative Colitis

Since ulcerative colitis (UC), a condition that causes inflammation in the colon and rectum, is never medically cured, certain lifestyle behaviors can help you manage symptoms and better cope with your condition. In addition to managing stress, paying attention to what you eat can have a big impact on your quality of life.

There is no single diet that works best for managing UC. In fact, no studies have shown that any specific diet improves symptoms or that any specific foods cause UC flare-ups. The best approach is to avoid or reduce the foods that aggravate your symptoms.

You should eat a well-balanced, healthy diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, such as a Mediterranean style diet. Avoid preservatives and emulsifiers, such as carrageenan, carboxymethylcellulose, and polysorbate-80.

Varicose Veins: Symptoms And Treatment (Harvard)

Can you prevent varicose veins?

Even if you have a family history of varicose veins, they aren’t always inevitable, says Dr. Sherry Scovell, a vascular and endovascular surgeon at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. Three simple strategies can help to prevent them.

1. Get moving. “Leading an active lifestyle is probably the most important thing that you can do for prevention,” says Dr. Scovell. Exercise, particularly walking, induces calf muscle contractions that keep blood flowing efficiently. “The calf muscles act like a heart for the veins,” she says. People sometimes believe that if they stand more and sit less, they can prevent vein problems. But that’s not true if you’re mostly standing still. “It’s better to move as much as possible,” says Dr. Scovell. Exercise also helps you maintain a healthy weight, which can keep varicose veins at bay.

2. Put your feet up. Give your legs a break by elevating your feet at the end of the day, and even during the middle of the day if you’ve got some spare time. This can relieve pressure on the veins to help keep them healthy.

3. Pull on compression stockings. These garments fit snugly on your legs, squeezing them slightly to help keep blood moving. People sometimes think they’re unfashionable and are reluctant to wear them. But today’s stockings don’t resemble old-fashioned versions, says Dr. Scovell. Compression stockings come in numerous styles, including calf-high tube socks, dress socks, and tall stockings that look like tights. “They make them in so many cool colors and patterns,” says Dr. Scovell. “They can be fashionable and still help your veins at the same time.” You can purchase over-the-counter compression stockings at a drugstore or get medical-grade options through your primary care doctor or a specialist.

COMMENTARY:

Varicose veins entered my vocabulary when I noticed that my feet were different in their coloration; my left foot was darker than my right, and had a bruise-like discoloration at the heel. Some enlargement and irregular “snaking” of my veins was also apparant at that time.

I went to see a vascular surgeon who performed an ultrasound on my veins, and informed  me that my popliteal valve, the one in the vein behind my knee, wasn’t working. This caused a constant column of blood, unchecked by a valve, to enlarge my veins.

I have been wearing compression stockings ever since, to slow down the enlargement of those veins.

My right leg has done better than my left, but still has a few varicose veins.

The compression stockings are hard for me to put on my legs, especially since I have arthritis in my hands. However, by learning a few tricks, this is not an intolerable burden.

First, you have to select your stockings. Jobst was the brand first suggested to me, and I used them for years. Recently, my big toe has been starting to cross over the second toe, a condition called “scissor toe”. The jobst stockings had toes in them, like most stockings, and I thought the compression acting on the toes was partially responsible for the scissor toe. Jobst has no open toe option that I can find. After going through several different brands, I settled on Sigvaris open toe. The label states the number of millimeters compression that is provided. More than 30 mm would be best, but 20-30mm. Is the tightest that my fingers will allow. More commonly I use 15 to 20, because after I swim the skin is wet, and wet skin simply gives too much friction to allow my painful hands to get the stockings on.

In the Harvard article, walking is also suggested, since the calf muscles act like a pumping mechanism on the deep veins to get the blood back to the heart. I learned from the article that the deep veins return 80% of the blood, and the superficial varicose veins only 20%, making them expendable. There are a number of different options for getting rid of the varicose veins, “sclerosing” them, including thermal and chemical treatments.

I walk a lot, going along with another suggestion from the article, although I don’t usually prop my legs up; I’m too busy running around to make propping a viable option.

Preventative treatment, such as I’ve been discussing, certainly beats having edematous legs with ulcers, such as I see in many older people.

—Dr. C.

Cancer Diagnosis: The Symptoms Of Lymphoma

Knowing the symptoms of Lymphoma is essential for diagnosis and early treatment. Painless lumps near the lymph nodes, extreme fatigue, high fever and significant weight loss without a known cause are all signs to watch for.

Chapters: 0:00 Intro 0:15 Lymphoma overview 0:46 3 “b-symptoms” of lymphoma 1:09 Other warning signs of lymphoma 2:11 When to contact your healthcare provider

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Diagnosis: Mayo Clinic Explains Liver Cancer

Learning about liver cancer can be intimidating. Let our experts walk you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.     

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction  0:22 What is liver cancer?  2:04 Who gets liver cancer? / Risk factors 3:02 Symptoms of liver cancer 3:52 How is liver cancer diagnosed?   4:48 Treatment options       5:36 Coping methods/ What now?      6:00 Ending   

For more reading visit: https://mayocl.in/3q8Lzwk

Brain Tumors: Causes And Types (Cleveland Clinic)

A brain tumor is a mass of cells in or around the brain. Tumors that develop in the brain are called primary tumors. Tumors that spread to the brain after forming in a different part of the body are called secondary tumors or metastatic tumors. This video focuses on primary tumors.

Chapters: 0:00 Intro 0:14 What is a brain tumor? 0:32 What causes brain tumors? 0:48 What are the signs of a brain tumor? 1:17 What is a meningioma? 1:51 What are 3 types of meningioma? 2:37 Don’t ignore the warning signs.

Kidney Cancer: Symptoms & Treatment (Mayo Clinic)

Learning about kidney cancer can be intimidating. Let our experts walk you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.   

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction 0:23 What is kidney cancer? 1:11 Who gets kidney cancer? / Risk factors  1:45 Symptoms of kidney cancer  2:22 How is kidney cancer diagnosed?    3:21 Treatment options      4:40 Coping methods/ What now?   5:32 Ending          

For more reading visit: https://mayocl.in/33QNzlb

Diagnosis: The Causes Of Fever Of Unknown Origin

Fever is just one of the number of symptoms that accompany most infections such as Covid and  influenza. When doctors can’t find a diagnosis for the fever, and it lasts for a few weeks, however, it is called fever of unknown origin, or FUO.

There are a bewildering number of illnesses that produce fever, and the mixture of these illnesses is different depending on geographic location, the type of hospital, and socioeconomic conditions.

Just like weight loss of unknown origin, or abdominal discomfort of unknown origin, fever without obvious cause is quite possibly be due to cancer in affluent America, and if you go in early you might have better outcomes with your treatment.

Fever has been known since earliest times, and was often considered a diagnosis on its own. In the past, the great majority of the fevers were infectious, and the outcome grave. In the mid 20th century, when I went to medical school, fevers were still mostly infectious. Antibiotics were the magic bullet, and were unfortunately overused. In underdeveloped countries, infections are still the most common cause, but in the developed world difficult to treat viral infections, autoimmune conditions, and cancer have been gaining in prominence.

When fever becomes excessive, and medication is needed, NSAIDS may be used, and works better on fever from infection than on fever from cancer. The take-home message for me is that if you use Naprosyn for a persistent fever, and isn’t effective, you might notify the doctor.

The motivation for me writing this article came from a very good posting in the New England Journal of medicine. They used a little humor, stating that modern FUO might be called “fever of too many origins”, what with all the indwelling catheters, implanted medical devices, shunts and long hospital stays. There is a separate category made for fever acquired in the hospital.

In people with AIDS, the evaluation is different depending on whether or not they are on treatment.

Tuberculosis is still a very common cause of fever.

Drugs are becoming increasingly responsible for troublesome fevers. In the early days of antibacterial therapy, sulfa  was the only drug available, frequently caused fever.  Now, sulfa is less used, and the penicillin derivatives are more common causes of fever.

If you have a fever, and have been traveling recently, be sure to tell the doctor. Your fever might be due to a tropical parasite such as malaria, particularly if you’ve been to West Africa.

Fever is an evolutionarily conserved body defense reaction and helps a person recover from an infection. The normal body temperature cycles according to the time of day; it is lowest first thing in the morning, and is higher later in the afternoon. The average body temperature used to be 37°C, or 98.6 F., but has been declining in recent decades, and is now about 36.5°C or 97.6°F. The use of electronic thermometers has cut down the amount of time needed to assess the body temperature, but added variability. I still prefer the old-fashioned thermometer.

Taking your temperature by whatever means you have available still remains a good idea when you don’t feel well.

—Dr. C.