Tag Archives: Prevention

HEALTHY LIVES: LIVING IN SYCH WITH BIOLOGICAL CLOCKS (SALK INSTITUTE)

Satchin Panda is a professor in Salk’s Regulatory Biology Laboratory. He explores the genes, molecules and cells that keep the whole body on the same biological clock, also known as a circadian rhythm. On this episode of Where Cures Begin, Panda talks about what a biological clock is, how living in sync with your clock can improve your health, and how growing up in India informed his research.

COVID-19: ‘INTRANASAL VACCINES’ MIGHT BE MORE EFFECTIVE THAN NEEDLES

From Scientific American (March 1, 2021):

Enter the intranasal vaccine, which abandons the needle and syringe for a spray container that looks more like a nasal decongestant. With a quick spritz up the nose, intranasal vaccines are designed to bolster immune defenses in the mucosa, triggering production of an antibody known as immunoglobulin A, which can block infection. This overwhelming response, called sterilizing immunity, reduces the chance that people will pass on the virus.

The development of highly effective COVID vaccines in less than a year is an extraordinary triumph of science. But several coronavirus variants have emerged that could at least partly evade the immune response induced by the vaccines. These variants should serve as a warning against complacency—and encourage us to explore a different type of vaccination, delivered as a spray in the nose. Intranasal vaccines could provide an additional degree of protection, and help reduce the spread of the virus.

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COVID-19: UNDERSTANDING THE NEW VARIANTS & NEW VACCINES EFFECTIVENESS

Researchers are scrambling to understand the biology of new coronavirus variants and the impact they might have on vaccine efficacy.

Around the world, concern is growing about the impact that new, faster-spreading variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus will have on the pandemic.

In this episode of Coronapod, we discuss what these variants are, and the best way to respond to them, in the face of increasing evidence that some can evade the immunity produced by vaccination or previous infection.

News: ‘A bloody mess’: Confusion reigns over naming of new COVID variants

News: Fast-spreading COVID variant can elude immune responses

News: Could new COVID variants undermine vaccines? Labs scramble to find out

News: How to redesign COVID vaccines so they protect against variants

News: J&J’s one-shot COVID vaccine offers hope for faster protection

HEART DISEASE: TYPES & RISK FACTORS (CLEVELAND CLINIC)

There are lots of things you can do to prevent heart disease! The key is to live a healthy lifestyle and see your doctor for regular checkups.

To learn more about heart disease risk factors, please visit https://cle.clinic/3r3iKQh

THE DOCTORS 101 CHRONIC SYMPTOMS & CONDITIONS #35: HIP FRACTURES

Hip fracture is an iconic bugaboo of old age. It is a chronic condition in the sense that its complications, such as Depression, blood clots and pneumonia often extend long beyond the healing process.

Predisposing factors include old age and associated risk factors like osteoporosis, sarcopenia (loss of muscle mass and strength), poor vision, poor balance and hazards in the home.

FALLING is the usual agency that produces the fracture. At the risk of being ostracized, I will point out that thousands of injuries sustained by walking or tripping over dogs (and cats) occur every year.

In my small “hilltop” group of friends, there was 1 fatality, 1 shoulder fracture-dislocation, 1 hip fracture, and 0 acknowledgements of animal causation. Members of the family are immune to blame.

Treatment of hip fracture involves surgery with pins, or the more cost-effective Hip replacement. PREVENTION is critical. Osteoporosis must be prevented by exercise, Calcium, vitamin D, and avoidance of certain medication like Corticosteroids.

Balance should be developed by exercises. Vision problems, such as cataracts,should be corrected. Muscle mass should be preserved by diet and exercise, and the home cleared of throw-rugs and obstacles removed.

Just yesterday, a friend wearing socks (reducing friction?) fell down some stairs after stepping over a dog-gate. She is scheduled to have her elbow pinned. Have I mentioned SLEEP, DIET and EXERCISE RECENTLY?

–Dr. C.

MEDICINE: ‘THREE CRITICAL BREAKTHROUGHS IN STROKE RESEARCH’ (YALE VIDEO)

Stroke is far more common than you might realize, affecting more than 795,000 people in the U.S. every year. It is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Yet until now, treatment options have been limited, despite the prevalence and severity of stroke.

Not so long ago, doctors didn’t have much more to offer stroke victims than empathy, says Kevin Sheth, MD, Division Chief of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology. “There wasn’t much you could do.” But that is changing. Recent breakthroughs offer new hope to patients and families. Beating the Clock Think of stroke as a plumbing problem in the brain. It occurs when there is a disruption of blood flow, either because of a vessel blockage (ischemic stroke) or rupture (hemorrhagic stroke).

In both cases, the interruption of blood flow starves brain cells of oxygen, causing them to become damaged and die. Delivering medical interventions early after a stroke can mean the difference between a full recovery and significant disability or death. Time matters. Unfortunately, stroke care often bottlenecks in the first stage: diagnosis. Sometimes, it’s a logistical issue; to identify the type, size, and location of a stroke requires MRI imaging, and the machinery itself can be difficult to access.

MRIs use powerful magnets to create detailed images of the body, which means they must be kept in bunker-type rooms, typically located in hospital basements. As a result, there is often a delay in getting MRI scans for stroke patients. Dr. Sheth collaborated with a group of doctors and engineers to develop a portable MRI machine. Though it captures the images doctors need to properly diagnose stroke, it uses a less powerful magnet. It is lightweight and can be easily wheeled to a patient’s bedside.

“It’s a paradigm shift – from taking a sick patient to the MRI to taking an MRI to a sick patient,” says Dr. Sheth. Stopping the Damage Once a stroke has been diagnosed, the work of mitigating the damage can begin. “Brain tissue is very vulnerable during the first hours after stroke,” says vascular neurologist Nils Petersen, MD. He and his team are using advanced neuro-monitoring technology to study how to manage a patient’s blood pressure in the very acute phase after a stroke.

Dr. Petersen’s research shows that optimal stroke treatment depends on personalization of blood pressure parameters. But calculating the ideal blood pressure for the minutes and hours after a patient has a stroke can be complicated. It depends on a variety of factors—it is not a one-size-fits-all scenario. Harnessing the Immune System Launching an inflammatory reaction is how the body responds to injury anywhere in the body – including the brain, following stroke. However, in this case, the resulting inflammation can sometimes cause even more damage.

But what if that immune response could be used to the patient’s advantage? “We’re trying to understand how we can harness the immune system’s knowledge about how to repair tissues after they’ve been injured,” says Lauren Sansing, MD, Academic Chief of the Division of Stroke and Vascular Neurology. Her team is working to understand the biological signals guiding the immune response to stroke.

That knowledge can then direct the development of targeted therapeutics for the treatment of stroke that minimize early injury and enhance recovery. “We want to be able to lead research efforts that change the lives of patients around the world,” says Dr. Sansing.

Learn about these developments and more in the video above.

For more information on aneurysms or #YaleMedicine, visit: https://www.yalemedicine.org/conditio…

HEALTH: ‘AT-HOME COVID-19 TESTS’ – ON THE WAY (VIDEO)

OraSure Technologies has blazed a trail in at-home diagnostic tests. Now, the Pennsylvania-based biotech company is working to produce a quick, over-the-counter coronavirus test that consumers can take in the privacy of their home with results available in minutes. NPR’s Allison Aubrey reports.

THE DOCTORS 101 CHRONIC SYMPTOMS AND CONDITIONS #26: HYPERTENSION

Hypertension places an extra load on the blood vessels and heart, and eventually causes them to become diseased. High Blood Pressure is therefore bad for the entire body, which depends on the blood vessels for delivering the nutrients and oxygen necessary for life.

Most hypertension happens from subtle changes in the body’s signalling systems, and often runs in families; This is called “essential hypertension”. Additionally, there are a number of diseases and conditions of which hypertension is a symptom. It is important to know if you have hypertension, and fortunately it is easy to discover.

A visit to the doctor, or even to the pharmacy will make a reading available, and if you are concerned, an automatic cuff is available for $20. A healthy lifestyle and weight Will help prevent and treat hypertension, as in so many other chronic conditions.

A variety of medications are available to treat hypertension, but ANY MEDICATION CAN PRODUCE SIDE EFFECTS. It is rare for an effective medication to produce only a single, desired effect on the body. I have never known a person who at some time did not experience some side effect from antihypertensive medications.

Be sure to maintain contact with your Doctor. The dose may be too high, causing episodes of LOW blood pressure with fainting. When I was in practice, any number of patients came to me with a chronic cough, which I “cured” by having their doctor replace their ACE Inhibitor with another medication.

Please read the accompanying Mayo Clinic article for a complete discussion of this important condition.

–Dr. C.

Mayo Clinic article

INFOGRAPHIC: ‘DIFFERENCES BETWEEN COVID-19, THE FLU AND ALLERGIES (2020)

COMMENTARY:

The infographic by the allergy and asthma foundation aims to distinguish between Covid, Influenza and allergy. I would like to discuss more than symptoms. Covid and Influenza are both caused by invading infectious viruses.

Allergy is an over-response by the sensitized body to harmless proteins from the environment Covid and Influenza viruses cause direct damage to the lining membranes of the respiratory tract provoking a protective response by the body which produces inflammation in the nose and lung. Rhinitis, bronchitis and pneumonia result, depending on the site of the inflammation.

The symptoms of Allergy are far different from both Influenza and covid. ITCHING of the nose, eyes and skin is the hallmark of allergic Rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis and Hives, respectively. Influenza or Covid Infection of the nose, eyes and airways can produce sneezing, redness, coughing and difficulty breathing, but not usually itching.

Fever is characteristic of Influenza and Covid, but not of uncomplicated Allergy. Asthma can result from either infection or allergy, but is a separate beast, caused by release of different inflammatory cytokines.

The ASTHMATIC REACTION shows itself in the BLOCKAGE of breathing of air OUT of the lung, on EXHALATION. This blockage on exhalation in asthma is heard as wheezing, a musical sound. Just ask the wheezing person to take a deep breath IN, which should be easier, and then breathe out as fast as possible, which should be slower and more difficult. Fever is not a feature of uncomplicated Asthma. Influenza and Covid.

Both produce FEVER, fatigue, aching and usually coughing. Covid has the greater linkage with Coughing, which often progresses to Shortness of breath. Both Influenza and Covid can produce a sore throat and runny nose. LOSS OF SENSE OF SMELL is unique to Covid, although if your nose is stuffy, the sense of smell can be impaired. Influenza preys on the very young, which are generally spared from Covid.

If you are careful about social distancing and wear masks in public, and get sick, Covid is more likely, since COVID IS MORE CONTAGIOUS THAN INFLUENZA. Covid protections will probably result in fewer cases of Influenza this winter.

To summarize,both the “flu” and Covid 19 are infectious conditions, vastly different from allergy, which is a derailed body defense mechanism. Any of the three can result in an asthmatic reaction, though the fever of influenza often lessens the Asthmatic response to that condition.. Covid is much more contagious and severe than influenza and can cause more widespread organ damage. Be sure to practice MASK WEARING AND SOCIAL DISTANCING.

If you have asthma and it worsens, in my opinion, this favors covid. My asthmatic patients often got better with the fever of Influenza. If you have a CHILD that gets sick, it is more likely to be Influenza than Covid.

–Dr. C