Tag Archives: Digestive Tract

Digestive: Gallstones VS Kidney Stones Symptoms

Gallstones (gallbladder stones) develop in your digestive tract and can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball. Gallstones can cause a blockage in your gallbladder or bile ducts. A diet high in fat or cholesterol can contribute to the development of gallstones.

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Kidney stones develop in your urinary tract and can be as small as a grain of sand but can grow to several inches in diameter. Kidney stones move through your urinary tract into your ureter and block the flow of urine. A diet high in sodium, oxalates or animal protein can contribute to the development of kidney stones. An insufficient intake of fluids or calcium can also lead to the formation of kidney stones.

Symptoms of gallstones

If you have gallstones, you may experience the following symptoms:

  • Abdominal pain.
  • Back pain.
  • Chest pain.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Fever and chills.
  • Jaundice.
  • Dark-colored urine.  

Where does it hurt?

Gallstones cause pain in your mid-upper abdomen that may radiate to your back or under your right shoulder.

Symptoms of kidney stones

If you have kidney stones, you may experience the following symptoms:

  • Severe back pain that may travel down to your groin.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Blood in your urine.
  • Painful urination.
  • Increased frequency or urgency of urination.
  • Foul-smelling or cloudy urine.
  • Fever and chills.

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Infographic: Colonic Diverticular Disease

Colonic Diverticular Diseaes is a condition in which small, bulging pouches develop in the digestive tract. It’s common in people over age 40.

Usually, no symptoms occur, unless the diverticula become inflamed or infected (diverticulitis) which can result in fever and abdominal pain.

Treatment generally isn’t needed unless there is inflammation (diverticulitis).

Infographic: Colonic Diverticular Disease

Intestines: Leaky Gut – Symptoms & Diagnosis

Inside our bellies, we have an extensive intestinal lining covering more than 4,000 square feet of surface area. When working properly, it forms a tight barrier that controls what gets absorbed into the bloodstream. An unhealthy gut lining may have large cracks or holes, allowing partially digested food, toxins, and bugs to penetrate the tissues beneath it. This may trigger inflammation and changes in the gut flora (normal bacteria) that could lead to problems within the digestive tract and beyond. The research world is booming today with studies showing that modifications in the intestinal bacteria and inflammation may play a role in the development of several common chronic diseases.