Tag Archives: Johns Hopkins Medicine

Medicine: What Causes Urinating Issues? (Video)

Trouble Urinating? There are many common causes for urinary issues in men. Learn about symptoms and treatment options offered by The Johns Hopkins Brady Urological Institute. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/brady…

Radiotherapy: ‘What Is Theranostics?’ (Video)

What is Theranostics? Dr. Martin Pomper, Director of the Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging division at Johns Hopkins, describes the mechanisms of a groundbreaking cancer treatment that combines imaging and molecular radiotherapy. With this method, radiopharmaceuticals can specifically target cancer cells while sparing most normal tissues. To learn more visit Nuclear Medicine Radiotheranostic Center: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/radio…

MEDICINE: BASEBALL GREAT CAL RIPKEN JR.’S ‘ROBOTIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY’

Known as the Ironman, Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. was diagnosed with prostate cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. Partnering with the Brady Urological Institute, Mr. Ripken had a successful robotic radical prostatectomy to remove his tumor and is now deemed cancer free. Watch urologic surgeon Mohamad Allaf and Cal Ripken Jr. discuss his prostate cancer journey at Johns Hopkins and share his powerful message to men across the world.

Technology: Augmented Reality Improves Spine Surgery Outcomes (Video)

Kay suffered from debilitating muscle cramping and lower back pain due to spondylolisthesis, a common condition in the lumbar spine. When nonsurgical treatment options failed, she turned to spine neurosurgeon Timothy Witham for help. He used a new augmented reality technology to accurately place spinal instrumentation in her back. Seven months after surgery, Kay has resumed her daily pursuits without pain and is enjoying life.

HEALTH VIDEOS: “HOW CORONAVIRUSES WORK”

It’s one of the tiniest machines on the planet — about a hundred times smaller than the average cell. It’s so small that no scientist can spot it through a typical light microscope. Only with an electron microscope can we see its spiky surface. It’s not alive, and it’s not what most of us would think of as “dead.” This teensy machine seems to survive in a kind of purgatory state, yet it has traveled across continents and oceans from host to host, and brought hundreds of nations to a standstill. Despite its diminutive size, the novel coronavirus, dubbed SARS-CoV-2, has seemingly taken the world by surprise with its virulence.

TELEMEDICINE: 80% OF PEDIATRIC PATIENTS SEEN REMOTELY AT JOHNS HOPKINS CHILDREN’S CENTER

From Johns Hopkins Medicine (April 30, 2020):

“A lot of our pediatric divisions are now seeing 80% or more of their patients by video or telephone,” says Hughes.

The Children’s Center’s preparations for the virus and the disease it causes, COVID-19, were unwittingly sparked by pediatrician Helen Hughes and her early work in telemedicine outreach for pediatric subspecialists. In 2018, she spearheaded development of a telemedicine collaboration with the Talbot County Health Department on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Pediatrician Helen Hughes during a video visit with a young patient and mom.. Johns Hopkins Medicine

The goal was to ease the burden of long treks to Johns Hopkins’ Baltimore campus for young patients — especially medically complex patients — for follow-up visits. At the time, she said, “This is where the future of health care is headed. Video technologies can allow us to do so many things for our patients without having to see them in person every time.”

The Children’s Center, notes Hughes, had been conducting between zero and eight video visits per month for the past two years. In the second half of March, after the coronavirus had clearly arrived, Johns Hopkins pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists saw 800 patients via telemedicine. That number increased to 1,400 telemedicine visits in the first half of April. Additionally, MyChart users in April jumped to 71%.

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