Tag Archives: Aspirin

Heart Health: When You Should Take Daily Aspirin

When should you take daily aspirin?

If you’ve had a heart attack or stroke: Taking a low-dose aspirin a day is an important part of your treatment. It can help you prevent another heart attack or stroke.

If you haven’t had a heart attack or stroke: Taking an aspirin a day may prevent heart attack or stroke, but it can also cause bleeding. Talk with your health care team about the risks and benefits of aspirin for you. In general, don’t take a daily aspirin if you are 60 or older and don’t have heart disease.

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DR. C’S MEDICINE CABINET: Benefits & Risks Of ‘Aspirin’

Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) was one of the first medicines constructed, or synthesized, in a chemical laboratory. After 40 years ( medical progress wasn’t too fast in the 19th Century), Bayer investigated it as an alternative to Salicylates, which had been used since antiquity in the form of Willow bark for medical treatment, especially of FEVER and PAIN relief.

It is an understatement to say that it was successful. After almost another century, in 1982, a nobel prize was awarded for the discovery of its mode of action. Its multiplicity of effects, some of them bad, are only now becoming appreciated. My practice in medicine was in Allergic diseases, and I treated many people with nasal, sinus and asthmatic diseases.

It became apparent that, in certain people, aspirin could worsen all 3 conditions, and rhinitis (with Polyps), sinusitis and asthma became known as “Samter’s Triad”, or simply ASPIRIN DISEASE. Believe it or not, the condition can be helped by “aspirin desensitization”, where the Patient was started on tiny doses of aspirin by mouth, which over a period of hours was gradually increased to a normal dose.

I would not try this at home. I sent my patients to a specialized medical center for treatment, Other undesirable effects induce bleeding disorders, stomach ulcers, and, in children, a very serious disease called Reye’s syndrome. The latter is so serious that aspirin is not often given to children; except when it is needed, such as in a condition called Kawasaki’s Disease, where it is very helpful.

I mention these details to counteract the blase attitude created by long use. No longer does the doctor say “Take an aspirin and call me in the morning”. For a long while, low-dose Aspirin was used in most Patients with coronary artery disease, as a method of preventing sudden clot formation. I took 65 mg. Of aspirin for years, even though I had no narrowing of my arteries.

Now it is found that aspirin can cause an excess of Hemorrhagic stroke, and it is not recommended in my age group and risk profile. Aspirin is a powerful medication with a wide variety of effects. Most of its beneficial effects have safer alternatives. Acetaminophen- Tylenol- is now used in place of Aspirin for Pain and fever relief. I suggest not using aspirin unless prescribed by a Doctor.

–Dr. C

THE DOCTORS 101 CHRONIC SYMPTOMS & CONDITIONS #2: NASAL CONGESTION

Chronic nasal congestion, the constant condition of not being able to breathe through your nose, can be a major problem, interferes with sleep (often via sleep apnea), undermining one of the 4 pillars of health (sleep, diet, exercise and intellectual stimulation). Well, maybe a second one as well, since it is hard to function intellectually when you are sleepy all the time.

Chronic nasal congestion in kids is often due to allergy and associated ADENOID (located at the back of the throat) ENLARGEMENT. Adenoids can cause sleep apnea and pulmonary hypertension, ear infections and sinusitis.

If left untreated, the bones of the face don’t grow properly, and the constricted bony structures can lead to later problems. Nasal polyps can be a factor in nasal airflow blockage, and their removal may benefit the blockage.

If associated with sinusitis and aspirin (aspirin is rarely used in children anymore because if Reyes’ Syndrome) sensitivity, the combination is known as “sampters’ triad. Regrowth of the polyps is common and aspirin desensitization may be helpful.

ALLERGIC RHINITIS is treated by avoidance, medication and desensitization. SINUSITIS can cause chronic nasal blockage. Both medical and surgical treatments are useful.

One-sided nasal blockage raises a red flag. One of my young patients had pushed a rock into his nose, which I then removed. Nasal polyps can be on one side, and can be removed, NASAL SEPTAL DEVIATION can cause one-sided nasal blockage, and if severe can be surgically corrected.

The nasal tissues are “erectile tissues” I have a nasal septal deviation to my left side. I SLEEP ON MY SIDE to CONTROL my SLEEP APNEA (more when I get to that subject, which certainly qualifies as a chronic problem), When I sleep on my right side, I don’t breathe as well since my “good side” is down and becomes study.

Those lucky people who breathe freely on both sides, and who sleep on their sides, may possibly be aware that the DOWN SIDE (my good side, above) blocks up. It seems that the nasal tissues are “erectile tissues” body wants to REST one side at a time, and the down side is easier, since gravity pools the blood there.

Nasal tissues are under the control of the autonomic nervous system, decongest (nasal passages are open) with the alarm (fight or flight, “sympathetic”) reaction, and do the opposite (tissues congest, nasal passages close) when the “parasympathetic” takes over after a meal, when you are “vegetating”. in front of the TV