Tag Archives: Urine

Screening Tests: What Makes Up A Urinalysis?

The urinalysis is a very good screening test, and therefore often ordered with an annual physical examination. It gives insight into a very vital organ, the kidney.

It is the definitive test for a urinary tract infections, which are very common particularly in women, with their short urethras, and is also very good at reflecting abnormalities in the body of various sorts.

Urine color– very helpful in many conditions, such as liver disease, hemolytic anemia, porphyria, and Homocystinuria. When I had my bladder cancer bleed, the urine was red in color of course.

Clarity – The presence of many small particles, such as white blood cells or bacteria will make the urine cloudy.

Urine specific gravity – Will be high if you’re drinking insufficient water.

Urine pH — Will be out of range in several conditions, such as urine infections and somatic acidosis, which can happen in diabetes.

Urine protein – Gets into the urine in some kidney conditions such as nephrosis.

Urine glucose – Is positive mainly in diabetes, which was very important to follow when I was practicing in order to follow the diabetes. It is still important in the early pick up of diabetes and people that didn’t know they had it. Blood sugars are much more used these days to follow diabetes.

Urine ketones – Can indicate out of control diabetes. Can also Occur with certain very low carbohydrate diets; keto diets are named for this effect.

Urine blood -A counter check to the microscopic examination for red blood cells.

Urine nitrite – Elevated with urinary tract infections, a check on microscopic white blood cells.

Urinary Urobilinogen – Elevated in certain liver diseases.

Urinary leukocytic esterase -A check on urinary white blood cells

Urinary microscopic examination:

Urinary RBC – Elevated in urinary tract bleeding in certain  kidney and bladder diseases.

Urinary WBC – Elevated with urinary tract infections

Transitional epithelial cells – Sometimes have significance to doctors

Urinary bacteria – Of course Indicates urinary tract infection

Urinary yeast and hyphae – May indicate a fungal infection.

The urinalysis I obtained when my red urine due to my bladder cancer alarmed me showed Red urine color 30 mg/dL urine proteins, large amount of blood, 10-15  red blood cells, (elevated) and a few bacteria and yeast, a spurious finding.

When you go in for a general physical, assuming that you are well, it is always comforting to have a negative urinalysis, a broad screening test for all kinds of different problems.

— Dr, C

THE DOCTORS 101 CHRONIC SYMPTOMS & CONDITIONS #38: HEMATURIA

Pink urine! You can imagine my shock. What could it be? I exercise more than 1½ hours a day. Could it be myoglobin? I put beets in my daily osterizer “shake”: could the color be from the anthocyanins from beets?

I took a urine specimen to the lab, and the color turned out to be from Hemoglobin, the most likely cause all along. There were lots of red blood cells in my urine and the test strip was strongly positive for Hemoglobin. I called a urologist, who said I needed a Urine culture for infection, and a “CT Urogram”, to check for cancer, kidney stones and other problems.

You should always check with your doctor with Hematuria, and I am no exception. My Urology appointment was in 1 week. I got a urine culture, Cell cytology (for cancer), a CT Urogram, and a urine culture before the visit. I wanted to save time by scheduling a Cystoscopy at the time of the first visit, but couldn’t arrange it.

I went for the appointment. They took a blood pressure, but didn’t check my urine, which I thought was negligent. I had been regularly checking my urine for blood by a test strip, and it was negative. The appointment lasted only minutes. My old urologist always checked my urine on every visit, regardless of whether it was a regular check or to consult for a problem. If I were a Urologist, you can be sure I would have my microscope ready, have the nurse collect the urine, spin it down, and put the sediment under the microscope for me to check.

When I was in medical practice as an allergist, I would have my nurse check any sputum the patient produced smeared on a slide, stained and dried. Microscopic examination of urine and sputum takes only seconds and yields lots of information. In my opinion, 50 years of Insurance surveillance and governmental regulations, including restrictions on lab work done in the doctor’s office and Hippa privacy laws, have handicapped Doctors and are partly responsible for the costly, dysfunctional system that is modern medicine.

Sorry for the Sermons. Visible blood in the urine-Gross Hematuria- requires that you see your Doctor and find the cause of that blood. Please see the 2 appended Mayo Clinic articles for more detail.

–Dr. C.