Tag Archives: Endocrinology

Insulin Resistance: Risk Factors And Treatment

Learning about insulin resistance, or prediabetes, can be intimidating. Eleanna De Filippis, M.D., Ph.D., an endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic, walks you through the facts, the questions, and the answers to help you better understand this condition.

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction 0:41 What is insulin resistance? 1:32 Who gets insulin resistance? / Risk factors 2:38 Symptoms of insulin resistance 4:04 How is insulin resistance diagnosed? 4:34 Treatment options 5:21 Coping methods/ What now? 5:41 Ending

COMMENTARY:

The (developed) world just has too much food. Food producers race with each other to make It tastier, to advertise it widely, and make it available on demand. As a consequence of their success, at least 1/2 of the developed world is overweight and has decreased insulin sensitivity, prediabetes or diabetes. This leads to severe health consequences in the form of hypertension, arteriosclerosis, heart disease, brain disease, liver disease, and a variety of back and joint problems.

Mankind did not evolve in an environment of chronic nutritional oversupply, but rather it’s reverse. Mankind did not develop in a sedentary environment, but rather it’s reverse.

Insulin resistance is caused by overfilled energy stores (excess fat), increased inflammation from distended, dying fat cells, excess fatty acids and stresses to some of the important micro structures in our cells, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, not to mention metabolic pathways such as the mTOR and Sirtuin systems.

Eating is a pleasure, and turning down food takes self-discipline, which is a pain, and is becoming increasingly unpopular. “Maybe a pill will come along to get rid of fat and prevent its accumulation”. but don’t count on it. The main hope for avoiding the danger of overnutrition is being discriminating about what and how much you eat.

Exercise is inconvenient and uncomfortable, but is the second necessity for a healthy life. Two of its many benefits is to increase adiponectin, which increases burning of the fatty acids which are so toxic to the body, and to increase insulin sensitivity, counteracting type two diabetes.

The third necessity is getting enough sleep.

Replay the old record. Diet, exercise and sleep, sleep  diet and exercise.

Please excuse me, it’s time for my evening exercise.

—Dr. C.

For more reading visit: https://mayocl.in/3waShVV.

Osteoporosis: What What Women Need To Know

Bones are living organisms that build and break down, but when the body loses more bone than it makes, problems can arise. Early detection and treatment can help those with bone loss maintain active lifestyles. Dr. Ejigayehu Abate, a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist, explains what women should know about osteoporosis.

Endocrinology: Thyroid Nodule Treatment (Video)

The Endocrine Surgery Program at Massachusetts General Hospital provides multidisciplinary, specialized treatment for thyroid nodules, a lump that commonly occurs in the thyroid. If you think that you may have a thyroid nodule, you should be evaluated by a physician. In this video, Sareh Parangi, MD, endocrine surgeon at Mass General, shares more about what to expect for diagnosis and treatment of thyroid nodules.

ENDOCRINOLOGY: BENEFITS OF TELEMEDICINE IN DIABETES MANAGEMENT

From an EndocrinologyAdvisor online article (April 27, 2020):

In the diabetes world where data from meter, pump, and sensor downloads are critical to management, telemedicine is an ideal way to interact with patients. The missing pieces are vital signs, especially blood pressure and weight, but often the patient can monitor these at home and provide trends. Diabetes experts can manage the majority of patients using the HbA1c test and other data the patient has recorded and downloaded to a website. These are easily accessible. I have had patients write down their glucose readings and fax the results as well.” Mark H. Schutta, MD, medical director of the Penn Rodebaugh Diabetes Center

In perhaps one of the most significant changes to occur in health care as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, telemedicine has suddenly reached the widespread adoption many proponents have championed for years. Recognizing the necessity of telemedicine in light of the current crisis — both to address increased treatment needs and to prevent unnecessary in-person contact — some payors and state legislators have loosened certain restrictions regarding its use across clinical specialties.

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